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TANZANIA

Kenya

 

TANZANIA

Tanzania Fast Facts

FULL NAME


PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

New Year’s Day 1 January
Human Rights Day 21 March
Good Friday (varies)
Family Day (varies)
Constitution Day 27 April
Workers’ Day 1 May
Youth Day 16 June
Women’s Day 9 August
Heritage Day 24 September
Day of Reconciliation 16 December
Christmas Day 25 December
Day of Goodwill 26 December
United Republic of Tanzania (formerly United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar)

CAPITAL
Dar es Salaam
INDEPENDENCE
9 December 1961
TIME
GMT +3 hours
POPULATION
31,270,820 (estimated July 1999)
AREA
945,090 (886,040 km2 land including Zanzibar, Mafia and Pemba Islands; 59,050 km2 water)
CURRENCY
Tanzania shilling (TSh or TZS)
PRESIDENT
President Benjamin William Mkapa
(since 23 November 1995)

 

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TANZANIA

Language and Culture


LANGUAGE
The official language is Swahili (Kiswahili), which is generally spoken, and various local languages abound. Kiswahili is the language the primary schools teach in. English is the second official language and the country's commercial language as well as the main teaching language for all the scientific subjects in secondary schools and higher education institutions. Arabic is widely spoken in the coastal areas, particularly in Zanzibar.
Useful KiSwahili greetings:
Greeting (to locals) Habari gani
Greeting (to foreigner) Jambo, shikamuu
Thank you (correct reply to greeting) Marahaba
Thank you Asante
Goodbye / We'll see you Kwaheri / Tutaonana
You are welcome, come in Karibu

CULTURE
Tanzania's culture is a result of African, Arab, European and Indian influences. The African people of Tanzania represent about 120 tribal groups. The largest group are of Bantu origin including Dukuma, Nyamwezi, Makonde, Haya and Chagga. The Maasai are of Nilotic origin, as are the Arusha and the Samburu. Tanzania is one of the least urbanised countries in Sub- Saharan Africa, but traditional African ideals are being deliberately adapted to modern life. The Tanzanians are friendly people, to foreigners and amongst themselves. Politeness, respect and modesty are highly valued. It is recommended that you learn some Swahili greetings (see "Language"). Handshakes are very important and you may continue holding hands during conversation. Note that the right hand is usually used for eating, while the left is traditionally used for toilet duties. Immodest attire, public affection and open anger are disrespectful to the Tanzanian people. In Zanzibar, it is important for women to dress modestly out of respect for Muslim cultural beliefs. Men should not wear shorts on the main island, and women should wear dresses that cover their shoulders and knees. This does not apply on Mnemba Island.

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TANZANIA

Getting around


BORDER POSTS
Just south of the equator, Tanzania borders Kenya and Uganda in the north; Zaire, Rwanda and Burundi in the west; and Zambia, Malawi and Moçambique in the south. Namanga Gate (between Tanzania and Kenya) is open 24 hrs per day. If you carry firearms you will require a special permit. The duty free allowance is limited to one litre of liquor; 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars or 250g of tobacco; and 250ml of perfume. Any other items are subject to customs duty.

RAIL & BUS

Tanzania has two rail lines. The Tazara line links Dar es Salaam with New Kapiri Mposhi in Zambia via Mbeya and Tunjambo. The central line links Dar es Salaam with Kigoma and Mwanza via Morogoro, Dodoma and Tabora. Rail is a safer, though a slower option of travel. Food can be purchased on board. Crime is not a major problem, but ensure you have your possessions with you at all times. Express and ordinary buses operate along major long distance routes. Express buses are slightly more expensive but are more comfortable. Ordinary buses tend to make more stops. Reservations are not always possible, so get to the bus with plenty of time before the scheduled departure. Buses are not permitted to operate at night. Ordinary buses and dalla-dallas (minivans) serve shorter routes. These are a slower and more dangerous option. Note that Tanzanian roads have a high accident rates, and buses tend to speed.

AIRPORTS
Domestic air services operate between the major airports:
» Dar es Salaam (DAR)
» Kilimanjaro (JRO)
» Kishni, Zanzibar (ZNZ)
There are a total of 129 in Tanzania, of which only ten are paved. Air services have become the most significant form of internal transport for official and business travel. Small planes, from charter companies, fly to towns and to bush airstrips.

ROADS
There are 88,200 km of highways in Tanzania, but only 3,704 km of these are tarred. The key roads are in good condition, though the majority are bad and hazardous. Road conditions in the reserves and national parks of Tanzania are extremely rough. During the rainy season, many roads are passable only with four-wheel drive vehicles. Tanzania is definitely not recommended as a self-drive destination. Any four-wheel drive vehicles for safaris usually have to be hired with a driver. Watch out for cyclists, pedestrians, livestock and wild animals. Most car rental companies do not allow self-drive outside of Dar es Salaam. Driving is on the left side of the road. Your home driving licence, with English translation if necessary, is accepted.

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TANZANIA

Passports and Visas

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
(as at June 2000)
This is a guide only - please check with your nearest Tanzanian Consulate for up to date information. Most visitors require visas with the exception of certain countries of the Commonwealth (British, Canadian and South African nationals require visas). It is advisable to obtain a visa in advance of travel as certain airlines insist on them prior to departure. Depending on nationality and country of origin, a visa may be obtained on arrival at Dar es Salaam and Kilimanjaro airports and at Namanga Gate on the Tanzania/Kenya border. Zanzibar remains independent although it is a part of the union of Tanzania. Passports and a Tanzanian visa are required even on a day's visit. Requirements may change so you are advised to contact your nearest Tanzanian Consulate before finalising your travel arrangements. Visas cost US$10-60 depending on nationality and are usually valid for three months. Requirements for obtaining a visa are: a passport, valid for six months beyond the intended length of stay, two passport photographs, two application forms and a detailed itinerary stating reason for visit.

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TANZANIA

General Accommodation Info


Most safari lodges vary in size and style, and are built to blend in with the environment. Accommodation tends to be of rondavel or banda type, with a lounge, central dining and bar in single unit hotels. Do not be misled by the term "tented accommodation" - this usually refers to luxurious insect-proof tents that are permanently pitched on concrete bases, often including en suite bathrooms with flush toilets. They are very popular and give the visitor the true experience of being close to nature without the inconvenience and discomfort that can be associated with camping in the open. All major towns in Tanzania have excellent luxury hotels. All towns will at least have a good guest house. Note that the word hotel (or in Swahili, hoteli) means food and drink only, rather than lodging. It would be better to use the word guesthouse (or in Swahili, guesti). Hotels often have their own restaurants. The main meal is at midday and many restaurants are closed in the evening. Local food is readily available. In the east, facing the rich Indian ocean, you will encounter wonderful seafood as well as great tasting fruit. National parks offer "ordinary" campsites which provide toilets, fireplaces and usually water taps. "Special" campsites usually only have a pit toilet. It is necessary to pre-book special campsites, and advisable to book ordinary ones. Camping is limited outside the national parks. Due to the distances traveled in Tanzania it is strongly recommended that you make all your arrangements in advance. During the migration and peak season, availability is at a premium.

TANZANIA

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TANZANIA

Health Requirements


Visitors must produce a valid yellow fever certificate obtained no less than ten days prior to travel. It is imperative that you obtain malaria prophylactics before entering Tanzania. When purchasing these please tell your doctor or pharmacist that you intend visiting Tanzania. Precautionary measures to take to prevent contact with mosquitoes include: insect repellent, cover up at sundown, sleep under a mosquito net and wear long sleeve clothing and long trousers in the evenings. Immunisation against cholera, polio, hepatitis A & B, typhoid and tetanus is recommended if traveling by road. There is a current warning that certain immigration authorities are insisting on cholera certificates or will administer a vaccine themselves.

Medical Services


Medical facilities are limited and medicines are often unavailable. If medical assistance is given, doctors and hospitals require immediate payment. It is therefore advisable to obtain medical insurance prior to travel. Emergency services and first aid is unavailable outside major cities and tourist areas. It is wise to bring with you any medication which you may require as you will not have access to pharmacies in most of the areas which you will be visiting. There is great concern about AIDS; recent estimates suggest that 10% of the population may be HIV-positive. There are many hospitals in Tanzania, but they are mostly very understaffed.

Travel Tips
Safety
Tanzania is considered to be generally safe, however extra care should be taken in Zanzibar and Dar Es Salaam. In the past there have been reports of muggings in game reserves and although the government has stepped up security, it is always better to be careful and to stay in close vicinity of other vehicles during your visit. Owing to muggings, bad roads, stray and wild animals, driving at night is not recommended.

Water
Drink only boiled or bottled water, bottled or canned drinks. If camping - bring your own drinking water and all other camping provisions.

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TANZANIA

Seasons and Climate


SUMMER: December - March
WINTER: March - May
The climate is tropical on the coast, on the islands and in Selous. It is temperate in the other parks. Temperatures on Mount Kilimanjaro and Meru drop to below freezing. Late March - late May is traditionally the long rainy season and is considered the "winter period" in Tanzania. June - late October is the dry season. June, July and August can be very cold on the rim of Ngorongoro Crater. Mnemba Island is lovely at this time of year, the evenings are cool (not cold) and the daytime can be hot. Late October - mid December is when the short rains occur. These are usually in the form of daily thunderstorms. The Ngorongoro Crater rim has a wonderful climate at this time of year. The Serengeti and Lake Manyara are quite warm and Mnemba is very hot. Mid December - March is summer weather. It is dry and very warm until March. Due to its altitude Ngorongoro Crater is much cooler than elsewhere.

What to pack

Generally, casual comfortable clothing is suitable throughout the year. The most practical items to pack are:
» Khaki, brown, white and beige colours
» Light cotton tops and cotton trousers/shorts in summer
» Long sleeved blouses/shirts for game drives, they will protect you from the sun and from mosquitoes
» Safari trousers for evenings and cooler days
» Fleece or sweater and a warm jacket for game drives (and at Ngorongoro Crater)
» Swimwear is a must for the beach and at Kleins and Grumeti which have a pool
» A hat, sunglasses and sunscreen
» Comfortable walking shoes
» For climbing Mount Kilimanjaro and Meru, thermal underwear, light layers, sweater, warm jacket, good socks and sturdy boots
When visiting Zanzibar, it is important for women to dress modestly out of respect for Muslim cultural beliefs, men should not wear shorts on the main island and women should wear dresses that cover their shoulders and knees. This does not apply on Mnemba Island.

When to go


Tanzania offers an astonishing diversity and concentration of wildlife, from the immense Serengeti and towering Mount Kilimanjaro to the remote national parks of Katavi and Mahale. The best months for climbing Mount Kilimanjaro are August to October and January to March. Tanzania boasts over 1 000 bird species, with Lake Manyara alone being home to more than 400. It is a year round birding destination, but at the height of the northern winter, some 160 species of migrating birds make their way south. Botanically, Tanzania is a treasure-trove, with habitats ranging from Afro-Alpine to semi-desert. The months immediately after the two rainy seasons provide the best floral displays. See under National Parks and Tourist Attractions for information on the migration. Tanzania offers excellent game viewing throughout the year as not all animals migrate and are year-round residents.

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TANZANIA

Currency

(go to an online currency converter by clicking here)

The unit of currency is the Tanzanian Shilling (TSh). Notes are issued as TSh10,000; 5000; 1000; 500; 200 and 100. Coins are TSh100; 50; 20; 10, 5 and 1.

Basic Costs
EXCHANGE RATE
The exchange rate is in your favour. Generally you will find that fine cuisine, wine and entertainment cost a fraction of the tariff charged by equivalent establishments elsewhere in the world. As a guide, petrol costs around TSh480 per litre.

BANKS
Banks and forex bureaux are available at the airport and in all main towns.
Banking hours:
Mon - Fri: 08:30 - 12:30
Sat: 08:30 - 13:30
A few branches in the major towns open until 16:30 on weekdays. Foreign currency in cash or traveler's cheques may be exchanged through authorised dealers, commercial banks and at Bureau de Change at the international airports, major towns and border posts. Visitors are strongly advised against changing money on the black market. Some of the black marketers are undercover policemen, while others are likely to be con artists.

BASIC COSTS


CREDIT CARDS
Visa and MasterCard are accepted by most top hotels and lodges around the country. In addition to credit cards, clients should bring US dollars cash and traveler's cheques.

TIPPING
Service charges are included in the bill and tips are forbidden, but are still accepted as a friendly gesture. Haggling is quite acceptable in shops selling local handcrafts.

SOUVENIRS


Tanzania has a good selection of traditional local crafts. These are available from craft shops in Dar es Salaam, Arusha and other major towns. There are also a number of craft centres and artists cooperatives where prices are good. Singida baskets can be purchased directly from the villages surrounding Singida, or from craft shops. Gogo woodcarving, including vibuya (carved gourds) and kanga traditional sarong-like garment are amongst some of the traditional items available for purchase. The mbuzi is a device used for shredding coconut. It is a small wooden stool with a metal piece and is available at markets throughout the country. If you intend cooking dishes at home that you have eaten along the coast, you may find this a useful acquisition.

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KENYA~~~~~~~~~~~~~~KENYA~~~~~~~~KENYA~~~~~~KENYA~~~~~~~~KENYA~~~~~~~~KENYA

KENYA

 

Fast Facts

FULLNAME

Jamhuri ya Kenya (Swahili); Republic of Kenya (English) (formerly British East Africa)

FLAG OF KENYA
Upon independence from Britain (Dec. 12, 1963), the Kenyan flag became official. It was based on the flag of the Kenya African National Union. Black is for the people, red for humanity and the struggle for freedom, green for the fertile land, and white for unity and peace. The shield and spears are traditional weapons of the Masai people.

CAPITAL

Nairobi

INDEPENDENCE

12 December 1963

TIME

GMT +3 hours

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

New Year’s Day 1 January
Good Friday (varies)
Easter Monday (varies)
Labour Day 1 May
Madaraka Day 1 June
Moi Day 10 October
Kenyatta Day 20 October
Independence Day 12 December
Christmas Day 25 December
Boxing Day 26 December

POPULATION

28,808,658 (estimated July 1999)

AREA

582,650 km2 (569,25 km2 land; 13,400 km2 water)
CURRENCY

Kenyan Shilling (KSh)

PRESIDENT

Mwai Kibaki

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KENYA


LANGUAGE


The national language is Swahili (KiSwahili) although English is spoken throughout. Kenyans involved in the tourist trade speak English, however it is good to have a working knowledge of Swahili. In total there are 42 ethnic languages in Kenya.

Useful KiSwahili phrases:
Welcome Karibu
Goodbye Kwaheri
Thank you Asante
You’re welcome Karibu
Yes Ndiyo
No Hapana
How are you? Habari?
I’m fine, thanks? Nzuri
Is this the way to . . .? Hii njia ya . . .?

CULTURE
There are more than 70 tribal groups among the Africans in Kenya. Differences between many of them are blurred - western cultural values are becoming more deep-seated and traditional values are disintegrating. There are many other tribes in Kenya; these include Kikuyu, Luhia, Luo and Kikamba as well as a plethora of minor tribal tongues

 

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KENYA

GETTING AROUND

BORDER POSTS
The major crossing point between Kenya and Tanzania is at Namanga, which is open 24 hours a day. Other crossings include Lunga Lunga and Taveta. The Ethiopian border post of Moyale is becoming increasingly dangerous because of civil fighting. The border was closed for a while but has now reopened. For those with four-wheel drive vehicles, a more adventurous route to the west near Lake Turkana is quite popular. Ask the locals for advice before trying this route. There is no border post on either side of the border crossing so you'll have to get your visa stamped in Nairobi. Malaba and Busimia are the main Ugandan border posts. At present there are no overland crossings with Somalia and Sudan as it is not safe to cross unless part of a refugee convoy.

RAIL & BUS
Rail is a safe, reliable form of public transport. Passenger services run from Mombasa to Malaba via Voi, Nairobi, Nakuru and Eldoret. It is essential to book tickets two to three days in advance. Kenya has a good network of buses, as well as matatus (minibuses) and share-taxis, but none are very safe as drivers tend to overload and speed, and horrific accidents are reported regularly. Where possible, rail travel should be the chosen means of transport. Private 18-seater buses offer shuttle services connecting Nairobi and Mombasa with Arusha and Moshi in Tanzania, which are more expensive, but more comfortable and safer.

AIRPORTS
Domestic air services operate between the major airports:
Jomo Kenyatta International, Nairobi (NBO)
Moi International, Mombasa (MBA)
Note that departure tax (US$20) is paid when you leave. For local flights this is KSh100 and US$20 for international flights (not payable in KSh). A number of airlines operate between Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu, Nanyuki, Malindi, Lamu and the national parks/reserves of Amboseli, Maasai. Mara and Samburu.

ROADS

There are 63,800 km of highways in Kenya, 8,863 km of which are paved. Roads are generally in good condition, but have deteriorated and some stretches are very unsafe. The A104 running from Mombasa to Malaba via Nairobi is a heavy truck route. High speed and unpredictable local driving habits are daily hazards on Kenyan roads. Roads in the north and northeast are predominantly dirt roads and in the rainy season are only navigable by four-wheel drive vehicles. Your national driving license is accepted, with an English translation if necessary. Driving is on the left side of the road. As fuel shortages can occur, it is best to fill your tanks before leaving a major town.

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KENYA

Passports and Visas

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
(as at June 2000)

This is a guide only – please check with your nearest Kenyan Consulate for up to date information. All visitors are required to carry a passport that is valid for six months beyond the intended length of stay. There should be sufficient blank pages for entry stamps upon arrival.

Nationals of the following countries do not require visas for a tourist stay of 30 days or less:
South Africa, Switzerland, Belgium, France, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, Spain, Italy, Austria, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, United States and Canada

Nationals of some countries may obtain visas upon arrival. Check with the Kenyan Consulate beforehand. Those wishing to enter Kenya on business or for longer than 30 days, should obtain a visa from their nearest Kenyan Consulate.

Requirements for this are:
» visa application form,
» business letter (for business visa),
» one passport photograph,
» proof of sufficient funds and onward travel / return ticket.

Visas cost about US$30 and are valid for three months. All visitors may be requested to show proof of sufficient funds and onward travel / return ticket

 

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KENYA

General Accommodation Info


Most safari lodges vary in size and style, and are built to blend in with the local environment. Accommodation tends to be of rondavel or banda type, with a lounge, central dining and bar in single unit hotels. Do not be misled by the term “tented accommodation” – this tends to be luxurious insect-proof tents and are usually permanently pitched on concrete bases, often including en suite bathrooms with flush toilets. These are very popular and give the visitor the true experience of being close to nature without the inconvenience and discomfort that can be associated with camping in the open. In the towns, cheaper hotels are definitely avoidable. Prices for higher range hotels vary according to season. Note that although prices may be quoted in US$, payment in local currency is the accepted norm. Campsites in national parks and game reserves tend to be very basic, with running water, but only pit toilets. It is strongly recommended that you reserve all your accommodation as far in advance as possible as availability is often at a premium, especially in peak season.

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KENYA

Requirements


Everyone entering Kenya must be in possession of a valid International Certificate of Vaccination against yellow fever. It is imperative that you obtain malaria prophylactics before entering Kenya. When purchasing these, please tell your doctor or pharmacist that you intend visiting Kenya. It is important to note that the Kenyan authorities have banned the use of chloroquine combinations as prophylactics, and instead recommend the use of either mefloquine (Lariam/Mefliam) or doxycycline. Start your course at least one week before entering Kenya and continue taking the pills for six weeks after leaving the country. If you suffer from side effects, try taking your malaria prophylactics at night, after dinner. Precautionary measures that you can take to prevent contact with mosquitoes are: sleeping under a bed net or in room/tent with mosquito proofing (remember to keep the flaps zipped at all times), spraying your accommodation with insecticide, making use of a mosquito repelling lotion or stick and wearing long sleeve clothes, trousers and socks when outside at night. Immunisation against typhoid, tetanus, tuberculosis, polio, & meningococcal meningitis are recommended.

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Medical Services


Medical services in Kenya are good in urban areas and in the vicinity of game parks and beaches, but are limited elsewhere. Doctors and hospitals often require immediate cash payment, but usually accept major credit cards. It is advisable to secure medical cover on your medical insurance before arriving in the country. Note that major hotels have contracts with physicians and dentists. Visitors are however advised to bring along supplies of specialised medication they may require. Otherwise, medicine may be purchased at pharmacies and emergency pharmacies are open all night.

Travel Tips
Safety
Travel in Kenya is generally entirely safe, however, there are the occasional regional ethnic skirmishes. You are advised to remain informed as to the situation in areas to which you plan to travel, particularly remote parts and borders. Ugandan, Somalian and Sudanese shifta (bandits) rove their borders with Kenya. Violent cross-border attacks and cattle raids occur, so it is best to avoid the border regions. Border crossings into Somalia and Sudan are strongly discouraged. Petty crime and theft occurs in some of the urban areas, so be vigilant and keep valuables concealed. Security within the parks is quite good, but never leave possessions unattended. It is always better to travel in a large group.

Water
While water in major towns is chlorinated and relatively safe to drink, there are frequent breakdowns and this can lead to mild to serious abdominal upsets for first time African travelers. Rather stick to sealed bottled water, which is available from most hotels and lodges, and which is highly advised for the first few weeks of your stay. Do not use ice cubes or eat rare meat, raw seafood or dairy products. Avoid roadside stands and street vendors and only eat well-cooked foods while they are still hot and fruits that can be peeled without contamination.

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KENYA

Seasons and Climate


SUMMER: December – March
WINTER: July – August
Kenya is divided by the equator and enjoys a tropical climate. It is hot and humid at the coast, temperate inland and very dry in the north and northeastern parts of the country. The hottest time is in February and March and the coldest in July and August.
The average annual temperatures in the main areas are:
Mombasa (coastal): Max. 30ºC, Min 22ºC
Nairobi: Max. 25ºC, Min 13ºC
North Plainlands: Max. 34ºC, Min 23ºC
The long rains occur from April to June and short rains from October to December. Rainfall is sometimes heavy and tends to fall in the afternoon and evenings.

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WHAT TO PACK


Generally, casual comfortable clothing is suitable throughout the year. The most practical items to pack for safari are:
» Khaki, green, beige and neutral colours
» Blouses and shirts with long sleeves (even in summer, they will protect you from the sun and from mosquitoes)
» T shirts
» Shorts or a light skirt
» Jeans or safari trousers for evenings and cooler days
» Some hotels and country clubs require gentlemen to wear a jacket and tie and women to be suitably attired for dinner
» A jacket and sweater are recommended for early morning and evening game drives
» Swimwear and beach apparel
» Comfortable walking shoes
» Sun block, sunglasses, hat, insect repellent, moisturiser and lip salve are all essentials

Good quality, locally made clothing and shoes for safaris are available in Nairobi and Mombasa shops at reasonable prices.
If you are traveling with an organised safari, it is important to check what your weight limit is. Generally you will need to restrict your luggage to 10-12 kg (packed in a soft bag) plus a reasonable amount of camera equipment.

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When to go


Kenya is a year round destination with excellent game viewing. One of Kenya’s greatest attractions is the annual wildebeest migration between Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. This takes place between June and September. Traditional peak season is January to March as this is when the weather is hot and dry and most comfortable for traveling. This is a good time for bird viewing on the Rift Valley lakes. Game viewing at perennial water holes is also good at this time. April – June and October – December are less popular times for visiting Kenya as these are the rainy seasons and flooding often occurs. However, it is usually possible to get around easily during these times and the rains do not hinder visibility.

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KENYA

Currency

(go to an online currency converter by clicking here)

The unit of currency is the Kenya Shilling (KSh), which is divided into 100 cents. Notes are in KSh1000, 500, 200, 100, 50, 20 and 10. Coins are KSH1, and 50, 10 and 5 cents.

BANKS
Banking hours: Mon – Fri 09:00 – 14:00
First Sat of each month 09:00 – 11:00
National and international banks have branches in Mombasa, Nairobi, Kisumu, Thika, Eldoret, Kericho and Nyeri and in most other major towns. Banks in Mombasa and the coastal areas open and close half an hour earlier. Banks and bureaux de change at international airports are open 24 hours a day

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BASIC COSTS

CREDIT CARDS
All major credit cards (MasterCard, Visa, Diners Club and American Express) are widely accepted.

TIPPING
This is not required but, unlike in some other African countries, is not forbidden either. Most hotels include a 10% service charge on the bill. If the service charge has not been included a KSh100 tip is usual, although the amount is entirely at the visitor’s discretion. Bear in mind that salaries in East Africa tend to be very low, and that people working in service industries rely on tips to supplement their wages. On safari you should tip your driver, cook and guide. These people do not earn very much so you should tip as much as you feel you can, about KSh150 per employee per day is about right, but of course this depends on you and how happy you were with your service.

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Souvenirs


As in most African countries, there is a huge range of cheap souvenirs to be purchased along the roadside. These are handmade, but mass produced so always check the quality before buying. Materials include ebony, soapstone and ivory. Note that it is illegal to export products that contain any elements of elephant, rhino or sea turtle. Tribal souvenirs are available, including Maasai beaded jewelry, kiondas (woven sisal baskets) and natural or decorated calabashes (dried gourds). Bright sarongs (kangas or kikois) make good wearable souvenirs. If you are after quality artwork, it is probably wisest to look in galleries and shops that deal in it, rather than buying on the black market.

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